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The Internal Power Training Blog

Check out the latest info and research from Coach Chris' explorations in the Subject of Internal Power.

Exploring every avenue ... Bookmark

In a step away from the mechanics of internal power, this post will deal with a subject that I come up against time and again in the internal arts community. A subject hotly debated but rarely agreed upon. The subject of ‘chi’.

 

More specifically I would like to address my apparent rejection of ‘Chi’ as a useful term in my writings and teachings.

 

It would be fair to say that for many years, the idea of Chi and the use of the term was a part of my practice. I had some teachers who would use the term regularly to describe feelings experienced during practice or to explain how they were able to create certain effects in a partner. So why do I so rarely use it now in my teachings or practice?

The power of breath Bookmark

The breath is intimately linked with Internal Practices. Almost all of the internal practies i have researched or encountered have a very close relationship with the breathing system.

Obviously without breath we would not be around to practice, but why is this part of the body process so deeply focused on in the internal arts? Over the next few posts we will be examining a small section of this very large topic!

But firstly and practically, we can say that the breath is a very useful tool to lead relaxation and to remove unwanted tension. When we ask someone to relax, one of their natural responces (if they are not thinking too hard) is to let out their breath. This is the natural way for us to release tension.

 

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